Aristophanic comedy (Book, 1972) [WorldCat.org]
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Aristophanic comedy

Author: K J Dover
Publisher: Berkeley : University of California Press, 1972.
Edition/Format:   Print book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
Professor Dover's newest book is designed for those who are interested in the history of comedy as an art form but who are not necessarily familiar with the Greek language. The eleven surviving plays of Aristophanes are treated as representative of a genre. Old Attic Comedy, which was artistically and intellectually homogeneous and gave expression to the spirit of Athenian society in the late fifth and early fourth  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Criticism, interpretation, etc
Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Dover, K.J. (Kenneth James), 1920-2010.
Aristophanic comedy.
Berkeley, University of California Press, 1972
(OCoLC)569878265
Named Person: Aristophanes; Aristophane; Aristophanes.; Aristophanes; Aristophanes; Aristophanes.
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: K J Dover
ISBN: 0520019768 9780520019768 0520022114 9780520022119
OCLC Number: 314063
Description: xiv, 253 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm
Contents: I. The evidence. The survival of the text --
Identification of speakers --
Stage directions --
Chronology. II. Theatrical conditions. Organization --
The theatre --
The actors. III. Fantasy. The plot of Birds --
Self-assertion --
Cause and effect --
Imagery and personification. IV. Illusion, instruction and entertainment. The Parabasis --
Prologues --
Theatrical references --
discontinuity of characterization. V. Structure and style. Contest and episodes --
Lyric stanzas --
Parody. VI. Acharnians. Synopsis --
Production --
Peace and war. VII. Knights. Synopsis --
Allegory --
Production --
Political leadership. VIII. Clouds. Synopsis --
The revision of the play --
Production --
Science, rhetoric and morality --
Socrates. IX. Wasps. Synopsis --
Production --
The character of Philokleon --
The law courts. X. Peace. Synopsis --
Production --
Peace and Panhellenism. XI. Birds. Synopsis --
Production --
Comic and tragic poetry. XII. Lysistrata. Synopsis --
The lyrics --
Characters --
Women and war. XIII. Women at the Thesmophoria. Synopsis --
Characters --
Topicality. XIV. Frogs. Synopsis --
The choruses --
Properties and machinery --
Problems of composition --
Criticism of tragedy. XV. Women in assembly. Synopsis --
The chorus --
Characters --
Staging --
women and property. XVI. Wealth. Synopsis --
Slaves in comedy --
Wealth and morality. XVII. Contemporaries and predecessors. The evidence --
Individual and genre --
Origins of comedy. XVIII. Posterity. Middle and new comedy --
Study and enjoyment --
Translation --
Imitation. I. The evidence --
II. Theatrical conditions --
III. Fantasy --
IV. Illusion, Instruction and Entertainment --
V. Structure and style --
VI. Acharnians --
VII. Knights --
VIII. Clouds --
IX. Wasps --
X. Peace --
XI. Birds --
XII. Lysistrata --
XIII. Women at the Thesmophoria --
XIV. Frogs --
XV. Women in Assembly --
XVI. Wealth --
XVII. Contemporaries and predecessors --
XVIII. Posterity.
Responsibility: K.J. Dover.

Abstract:

Professor Dover's newest book is designed for those who are interested in the history of comedy as an art form but who are not necessarily familiar with the Greek language. The eleven surviving plays of Aristophanes are treated as representative of a genre. Old Attic Comedy, which was artistically and intellectually homogeneous and gave expression to the spirit of Athenian society in the late fifth and early fourth centuries B.C. Aristophanes is regarded primarily not as a reformer or propagandist but as a dramatist who sought, in competition with his rivals, to win the esteem both of the general public and of the cultivated and critical minority. He succeeded in this effort by making people laugh, and the book pays more attention than has generally been paid to the technical means, whether of language or of situation, on which Aristophanes' humor depends. Particular emphasis is laid on his indifference-positively assisted by the physical limitations of the Greek theatre and the conditions of the Athenian dramatic festivals-to the maintenance of continuous "dramatic illusion" or to the provision of a dramatic event with the antecedents and consequences which might logically be expected. More importance is attached to Aristophanes' adoption of popular attitudes and beliefs, to his creation of uninhibited characters with which the spectators could identify themselves, and to his acceptance of the comic poet's traditional role as a mordant but jocular critic of morals, than to any identifiable and consistent elements in his political standpoint.

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