Assessment of higher order thinking in mathematics : the definite integral. (Book, 1992) [WorldCat.org]
skip to content
New WorldCat.org coming soon
Assessment of higher order thinking in mathematics : the definite integral.
Checking...

Assessment of higher order thinking in mathematics : the definite integral.

Author: Mary Ellen Flood FoleyClarence J DockweilerGerald O KulmJames R BooneFrancis E ClarkAll authors
Publisher: 1992.
Dissertation: Ph. D. Texas A & M University 1992
Edition/Format:   Thesis/dissertation : Thesis/dissertation : Manuscript   Archival Material : English
Summary:
This study was designed to examine open-ended assessment items which target conceptual, procedural, or strategic knowledge of the definite integral. Two research questions were considered. The first question was: To what extent does student performance on each item reflect the targeted knowledge type? The second question targeted student knowledge: What do students know about the definite integral? Students from  Read more...
Subjects
More like this

Find a copy online

Links to this item

Find a copy in the library

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Finding libraries that hold this item...

Details

Genre/Form: Academic Dissertation
Academic theses
Thèses et écrits académiques
Material Type: Thesis/dissertation, Manuscript, Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Archival Material, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Mary Ellen Flood Foley; Clarence J Dockweiler; Gerald O Kulm; James R Boone; Francis E Clark; Texas A & M University,
OCLC Number: 31492314
Notes: Vita.
"Major subject: Curriculum and Instruction."
Description: viii, 114 leaves : illustrations ; 28 cm

Abstract:

This study was designed to examine open-ended assessment items which target conceptual, procedural, or strategic knowledge of the definite integral. Two research questions were considered. The first question was: To what extent does student performance on each item reflect the targeted knowledge type? The second question targeted student knowledge: What do students know about the definite integral? Students from both honors and engineering calculus classes were given open-ended assessment items, followed by interviews. It was found that at one point in students' growth in procedural knowledge over the semester, performance on procedural questions was masked by strategic concerns. By the end of the course, however, procedural knowledge was again displayed in response to procedural questions. Student responses to conceptual questions revealed not only the conceptual links which the students had formed but also the links which were missing. Because responses to open-ended questions are written in natural language form, care must be taken not to read more into an answer than is there. The strongest conceptual links were between integral and area, and between integral and antiderivative. The weakest conceptual link was between integral and limit of Riemann sum. Strategic items did yield a path to an answer, although students generally displayed only one path, and not all possible strategies were found.

Reviews

Retrieving GoodReads reviews...
Retrieving DOGObooks reviews...

Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.