The religious pilgrimage of Israel (Book, 1947) [WorldCat.org]
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The religious pilgrimage of Israel

Author: I G Matthews
Publisher: New York : Harper, ©1947.
Edition/Format:   Print book : English : 1st edView all editions and formats
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Genre/Form: History
Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Matthews, I.G. (Isaac George), 1871-1959.
Religious pilgrimage of Israel.
New York : Harper, [1947]
(OCoLC)609043668
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: I G Matthews
OCLC Number: 1225895
Description: xii, 304 pages ; 25 cm
Contents: I. Introduction: The meaning of religion --
Religion in general --
Definitions --
Unicersal; an experimental, vital process --
Religion in Israel, in particular --
A social phenomenon; obscured by interpretations and translations --
To be understood in its oriental background --
II. The religion of the semi nomads --
Ancestry and background --
Economic and social conditions --
Organization --
Kingship and blood revenge --
Mental characteristics --
Primitive philosophy --
Religious ideas and practices --
III. The religion of the Sinai confederates (1250 B.C.) --
The shepherd clans in Goshen --
Geography and history --
Moses the deliverer --
Legends --
Kenite and Egyptian influence --
A Levite? --
Sinai and ancient sanctuary --
Tribes that joined the union --
The process of assimilation --
Yahweh and the covenant --
The name and the essential features --
Pledges and rites --
Yahweh: absolute, kindly, mobile, moral, and jealous --
A final episode --
IV. The religion of the Canaanites (1250 B.C.) --
The population of Canaan --
Racial origins mixed --
Culture complex, of a high order --
Ben Sirach 24:1-34; Prov. 8:1-9:6; Job 28:1-27; Wisdom of Solomon 7:1-8:36 --
XIII. The religion of the state-church (550-400 B.C.) --
Racially different from the prophets --
Program, language, and outlook --
Holiness code (Lev. 17:1-26:46), 550 B.C. --
Ceremonial practices and prosperity --
Temple vision (Ezek. 40-48), 500 B.C. --
National reorganization to attain prosperity --
Priest code, 400 B.C. --
Cleansing required for everything --
Water, blood, incense, and fire offerings are effective --
The chosen people --
Responsibilities --
XIII. The religion of mankind (500-100 B.C.) --
The homely virtues --
The Jew in business, and at home --
The Jew under the influence of Greek culture --
Universal brotherhood of man --
Legalism, racialism, and sacerdotalism rejected --
Ruth; Jonah --
Isaiah 56:1-8; 66:21; 19:19-25 --
XIV. The religion of supernaturalism (250 B.C --
A.D. 135) --
Messianism --
The hope of the Kingdom --
Apocalyticism --
Origin and background, court prophets --
Armageddon --
Day of Yahweh --
Literature --
Isaiah 13:1-14:23; 24:1-23; 25:6-8; 26:20-17; 1, 12, 13; Zep. --
Joel --
Daniel --
Characteristics; anonymous, pseudepigraphic, pessimistic, catastrophic --
Meaning unfolded in symbols --
Values --
XV. The religion of Judaism (400 B.C. --
A.D. 135) --
The Jew in the homeland (400-141 B.C.) --
Ruled by Persia, Greece, Egypt, Syria --
Insurrections; deportations --
City life the norm --
Hellenism and reactions therefrom --
Wealth accumulated by leaders --
Literary activity --
I and II Chronicles, Ezra, Nehemiah --
Septuagint --
Ben Sirach --
Psalms --
Organization of Levitical order --
Music --
Scribal activity --
Ritual --
The second Jewish commonwealth (141-63 B.C.) The Maccabean revolt --
Freedom of religion established --
National ambitions aroused --
Independence granted --
Conflicts within and without --
Sanhedrin --
The Jew under Rome (63 B.C. --
A.D. 135) --
Struggle for self-government --
Problems of taxes and images --
Rebellions and tragedy --
Jerusalem destroyed in A.D. 73, wiped out in A.D. 135 --
The Jew among the nations (500 B.C. --
A.D. 135) --
Dispersion --
More than 300 colonies, with some 4, 000, 000 people within the Roman Empire --
Isolated, yet adopting the customs of the Gentiles --
United to Jewry and Jerusalem by synagogue, worship, education --
After A.D. 70 the Torah, interpreted by the rabbinic schools and the teachers, remained --
Judaism, by the forces of history liberated from nation, land, and temple, a religion that emphasized a way of life.
Responsibility: I.G. Matthews.

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