Seems like murder here : Southern violence and the blues tradition (Book, 2003) [WorldCat.org]
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Seems like murder here : Southern violence and the blues tradition

Author: Adam Gussow
Publisher: Chicago, Ill. ; London : University of Chicago Press, 2002.
Edition/Format:   Print book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
Blues recording artist and critic Adam Gussow begins his story in the 1890s, when the spectacle lynching of blacks became an insidious part of Southern life. Gussow identifies veiled references to real life incidents of these lynchings within the words of blues songs and literature.
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Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Adam Gussow
ISBN: 0226310973 9780226310978 0226310981 9780226310985
OCLC Number: 50747092
Description: 336 pages ; 23 cm
Contents: "I'm tore down" --
Lynching and the birth of a blues tradition --
"Make my getaway" --
Southern violence and blues entrepreneurship in W.C. Handy's Father of the blues --
Dis(re)memberment blues --
Narratives of abjection and redress --
"Shoot myself a cop" --
Mamie Smith's "Crazy blues" as social text --
Guns, knives, and buckets of blood --
The predicament of blues culture --
"The blade already crying in my flesh" --
Zora Neale Hurston's blues narratives. 1. "I'm Tore Down": Lynching and the Birth of a Blues Tradition --
2. "Make My Getaway": Southern Violence and Blues Entrepreneurship in W. C. Handy's Father of the Blues --
3. Dis(Re)memberment Blues: Narratives of Abjection and Redress --
4. "Shoot Myself a Cop": Mamie Smith's "Crazy Blues" as Social Text --
5. Guns, Knives, and Buckets of Blood: The Predicament of Blues Culture --
6. "The Blade Already Crying in My Flesh": Zora Neale Hurston's Blues Narratives.
Responsibility: Adam Gussow.

Abstract:

Blues recording artist and critic Adam Gussow begins his story in the 1890s, when the spectacle lynching of blacks became an insidious part of Southern life. Gussow identifies veiled references to  Read more...

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"Beneath the effusive and effervescent tone of Mister Satan's Apprentice lie gnawing questions of race and identity, of cultural imperialism and human connection. And precisely because Gussow stays Read more...

 
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