Syngué sabour : pierre de patience (Book, 2008) [WorldCat.org]
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Syngué sabour : pierre de patience

Author: Atiq Rahimi
Publisher: Paris : P.O.L, ©2008.
Edition/Format:   Print book : Fiction : FrenchView all editions and formats
Summary:
In Persian mythology, Syngué Sabour is the name of a magic black stone, representing patience that welcomes and absorbs all the troubles and worries of the people talking to it. It is epitomized by a soldier who has been shot in the neck but who miraculously survives. He is now lying in his bed, in a coma, his wife by his side, nursing him while caring for their two daughters. In the early stages of his coma, she  Read more...
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Details

Genre/Form: Novels
Translations
Persian fiction
Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Rahimi, Atiq.
Syngué sabour.
Paris : P.O.L, ©2008
(OCoLC)655158683
Material Type: Fiction, Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Atiq Rahimi
ISBN: 9782846822770 2846822778
OCLC Number: 247835858
Language Note: In French.
Awards: Prix Goncourt, 2008.
Description: 154 pages ; 21 cm
Responsibility: Atiq Rahimi.
More information:

Abstract:

In Persian mythology, Syngué Sabour is the name of a magic black stone, representing patience that welcomes and absorbs all the troubles and worries of the people talking to it. It is epitomized by a soldier who has been shot in the neck but who miraculously survives. He is now lying in his bed, in a coma, his wife by his side, nursing him while caring for their two daughters. In the early stages of his coma, she speaks gently to him, but as the days pass and he shows no sign of recovery, all she can do is cry and lament. She begins a long monologue while outside of the house, where soldiers are fighting, killing, and looting. It is a long tirade, with no restraint, about how she wishes to break free of the domestic, social, and religious oppression of her land, which might be Afghanistan. This is a tribute to the fight of Muslim women against fundamentalism.

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