Tomatoland : how modern industrial agriculture destroyed our most alluring fruit (Book, 2012) [WorldCat.org]
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Tomatoland : how modern industrial agriculture destroyed our most alluring fruit

Author: Barry Estabrook
Publisher: [Kansas City, Missouri] : Andrews McMeel Publishing, ©2012.
Edition/Format:   Print book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
Investigative food journalist Barry Estabrook reveals the huge human and environmental cost of the $5 billion fresh tomato industry and the price we pay as a society when we take taste and thought out of our food purchases.
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Details

Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Barry Estabrook
ISBN: 9781449423452 1449423450
OCLC Number: 790245024
Notes: Portions of this book have appeared in different form in Gourmet, Gastronomica, Saveur, and the Washington Post.
Description: xxi, 233 pages : illustrations ; 22 cm
Contents: On the tomato trail --
Roots --
A tomato grows in Florida --
Chemical warfare --
From the hands of a slave --
An unfair fight --
A penny per pound --
Matters of taste --
Building a better tomato --
Tomatoman --
Wild things.
Responsibility: Barry Estabrook.
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Abstract:

Investigative food journalist Barry Estabrook reveals the huge human and environmental cost of the $5 billion fresh tomato industry and the price we pay as a society when we take taste and thought out of our food purchases.

Supermarket produce sections bulging with a year-round supply of perfectly round, bright red-orange tomatoes have become all but a national birthright. But in Tomatoland, which is based on his James Beard Award-winning article, "The Price of Tomatoes," investigative food journalist Barry Estabrook reveals the huge human and environmental cost of the $5 billion fresh tomato industry. Fields are sprayed with more than one hundred different herbicides and pesticides. Tomatoes are picked hard and green and artificially gassed until their skins acquire a marketable hue. Modern plant breeding has tripled yields, but has also produced fruits with dramatically reduced amounts of calcium, vitamin A, and vitamin C, and tomatoes that have fourteen times more sodium than the tomatoes our parents enjoyed. The relentless drive for low costs has fostered a thriving modern-day slave trade in the United States. How have we come to this point? Estabrook traces the supermarket tomato from its birthplace in the deserts of Peru to the impoverished town of Immokalee, Florida, a.k.a. the tomato capital of the United States. He visits the laboratories of seedsmen trying to develop varieties that can withstand the rigors of agribusiness and still taste like a garden tomato, and then moves on to commercial growers who operate on tens of thousands of acres, and eventually to a hillside field in Pennsylvania, where he meets an obsessed farmer who produces delectable tomatoes for the nation's top restaurants.--Publisher's description.

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