Work, gender, and family in Victorian England (Book, 1995) [WorldCat.org]
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Work, gender, and family in Victorian England

Author: Karl Ittmann
Publisher: Washington Square, N.Y. : New York University Press, 1995.
Edition/Format:   Print book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
The industrial revolution radically altered traditional ways of life in many towns and villages. Successive waves of economic and social reorganization forced working-class communities to readjust constantly to new ways of life and work. Many feared the social consequences of such rapid change. These fears focused on the family and its swift transformation by industrialization. The greater economic and social role
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Details

Genre/Form: History
Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Karl Ittmann
ISBN: 0814737560 9780814737569
OCLC Number: 31328295
Description: xii, 341 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm
Contents: 1. The Worsted Trade and the Development of Bradford. The rise of the worsted industry, 1750-1850. Bradford's economy in the mid-Victorian era. Occupation and class in mid-Victorian Bradford. Management and the problem of costs in the worsted trade. The end of prosperity --
the slump of the 1870s --
2. Work and Its Discontents. Labor process in the worsted industry. Skill and the reorganization of the worsted trade. The organization of labor in spinning and weaving. The organization of labor outside of spinning and weaving. Grievances and work conditions. Overlookers and the control of labor. The worsted committee and labor discipline. Trade unionism in the worsted industry. The problem of labor in mid-Victorian Bradford --
3. Politics in Bradford 1850-1900. The emergence of liberalism. The challenge of working-class politics --
4. High and Low Culture in Victorian Bradford. The making of an industrial city. Voluntarism and urban society. Religion in mid-Victorian Bradford.
Responsibility: Karl Ittmann.
More information:

Abstract:

The industrial revolution radically altered traditional ways of life in many towns and villages. Successive waves of economic and social reorganization forced working-class communities to readjust constantly to new ways of life and work. Many feared the social consequences of such rapid change. These fears focused on the family and its swift transformation by industrialization. The greater economic and social role of women, the changing relationship between parents and children, and the decline of masculine power all played a role in a perceived crisis of the family. Increases in crime, infanticide, abortion, poverty, and the use of birth control were all tied to this concern about the destruction of the family and the resulting social chaos.

By the late nineteenth century in most of Europe and the United States, the deliberate limitation of family size had become a general phenomenon. This fall in family size resulted, Karl Ittmann argues, not from newfound prosperity or the universality of "Victorian values," but rather from the need for families to protect themselves from the uncertainties of modern life. This uncoupling of sexuality and reproduction sent shock waves through western societies that still resonate today. Focusing on West Yorkshire, England, in the latter half of the nineteenth century, this book illuminates the many social, personal, and familial crises brought on by the industrial revolution. Through an intimate reading of the town of Bradford, center of the world's worsted trade in the heartland of the industrial revolution, Karl Ittmann recreates the web of material and social forces that shaped the decisions of working men and women about family life.

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